Exhibition – The Treasury Collection: Works by Maria Sibylla Merian

31 March to 18 June 2017 Cromhouthuis, Amsterdam

The Cromhouthuis is currently hosting an exhibition of the paintings and illustrations of the naturalist and artist Maria Sibylla Merian. In her research as a naturalist, Merian examined caterpillars, butterflies, and other insects in their natural environment (f.e. in Surinam), and, as a result, produced works that did not just make a contribution to science, but also to art.

Exhibition – Making Nature: How We See Animals

Wellcome Collection, London, 1 December 2016 — 21 May 2017

Curated by Honor Beddard

Exhibited are over 100 objects from literature, film, taxidermy and photography  reflecting what we think, feel and value about other species and the consequences this has for the world around us.

The collection includes works by contemporary artists such as Allora, Calzadilla and Phillip Warnell and asks how and why we look at animals and what we see when we do that. It is organised around four themes: ‘Ordering’, ‘Displaying’, ‘Observing’ and ‘Making’, and it opens with Marcus Coates’ Degreecoordinates, Shared traits of the Hominini (Humans, Bonobos and Chimpanzees), 2015.

‘Making Nature’ reveals the hierarchies in our view of the natural world, and questions how these influence our actions and inactions towards the planet: from the formalisation of natural history as a science, through the establishment of museums and zoos, to lavish contemporary wildlife documentaries.

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More info and the free downloadable large print guide text (also available in the gallery) are available here.

Whose Sari Now?

Theatre Royal Stratford East, London

As explained on the website of the Theatre:

“One woman plays five characters who share their sari tales.
Bold and powerful theatre that takes you beyond the Bollywood wet sari!By turns funny and poignant, 5 characters share their sari tales; from an old Asian woman whose saris are like her second skin, a young mother giving birth in a war zone wrapping her twin babies in her wedding sari, a Malaysian historian connects the sari with mythology, a transgender reflects on his girlfriend’s sari obsession, a low caste weaver and a character who contemplates the sari in her final hours”

Read more here.sari

Opening of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

On Saturday, September 24 the museum will be opening to the public.

“After 13 years of hard work and dedication on the part of so many, I am thrilled that we now have this good news to share with the nation and the world,” said Lonnie Bunch, the museum’s founding director.

The museum will open with 11 inaugural exhibitions that will focus on broad themes of history, culture and community. The exhibitions have been designed by museum historians in collaboration with Ralph Appelbaum Associates. These exhibitions will feature some of the more that 34,000 artifacts the museum has collected since the legislation establishing it was signed in 2003. The museum’s collections are designed to illustrate the major periods of African American history. Highlights include: a segregation-era Southern Railway car (c. 1920), Nat Turner’s Bible (c. 1830s), Michael Jackson’s fedora (c. 1992), a slave cabin from Edisto Island, S.C. plantation (c. early 1800s), Harriet Tubman’s hymnal (c. 1876) and works of art by Charles Alston, Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, and Henry O. Tanner.

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This booklet was produced by  John Murray Forbes in December 1862 specifically for Union soldiers to read and distribute among African Americans.

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

 

 

 

 

Around the event, a three-day festival showcasing popular music, literature and dance, some of them  co-hosted by other museums around the country and in Africa, will take place.

More informations about the museum can be found here.

The Getty Research Portal has a new face

The Getty Research Portal’s online library of digitized art history texts has been expanded with new website features and more contributing libraries in order to improve the features currently offered to its users.

The Getty Research Portal™ is a free web platform for accessing  a quite extensive collection of digitized art history texts from a range of institutions. Researchers can search and download complete digital copies of publications devoted to art, architecture, material culture, and related fields.

The Portal is a collaborative project initiated by the Getty Research Institute in 2012 and founded with a group of international contributors, including: the Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library at Columbia University, the Biblioteca de la Universidad de Málaga, the Frick Art Reference Library, the Heidelberg University Library, the Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte in Rome, the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, the Menil Library Collection in Houston, the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries — Art Institute of Chicago, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Library and Archives in New York, the Warburg Institute Library in London and the Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Scanning stations at the Getty Research Institute Annex location in Valencia

Exhibition: Art and Stories from Mughal India

The Cleveland Museum of Art, 31 July — 23 October 2016

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The dream of Zulaykha, from the Amber Album, c. 1670. India, Mughal. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper; 32 x 24.4 cm (page); 21.9 x 15.4 cm (painting). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection, 2013.332 (recto).

The centennial exhibition Art and Stories from Mughal India focuses on four stories—an epic, a fable, a mystic romance, and a sacred biography—embedded within the overarching story of the Mughals themselves as told through 100 paintings drawn from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s world-class holdings.

The Mughal Empire existed for more than 300 years, from the early 1500s until the arrival of British colonial rule in 1857, encompassing territory that included vast portions of the Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan. The Mughal rulers were Central Asian Muslims who assimilated many religious faiths under their administration. Famed for its distinctive architecture, including the Taj Mahal, the Mughal Empire is also renowned for its colorful and engaging paintings. Many of these take the form of narrative tales that not only delight the eye but also reveal fascinating ways in which the empire’s diverse cultural traditions found their way into royal creative expressions.

 

Rounding out the exhibition is a selection of costumes, textiles, jewelry, arms and armor, architectural elements, and decorative arts on loan from museums across the country.

Interested can explore the  free Mughal app for a more in-depth experience.

More informations can be found here.