‘Soul-crushing’ video of starving polar bear exposes climate crisis, experts say

Footage from Canada’s Arctic shows emaciated animal seeking food in scene that left researchers ‘pushing through their tears’.

Video footage captured in Canada’s Arctic has offered a devastating look at the impact climate change is having on polar bears in the region, showing an emaciated bear clinging to life as it scrounged for food on iceless land.

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/maps/embed/dec/2017-12-08T21:51:50.html

The scene was recorded by the conservation group Sea Legacy during a late summer expedition in Baffin Island. “My entire Sea Legacy team was pushing through their tears and emotions while documenting this dying polar bear,” photographer Paul Nicklen wrote on social media after publishing the footage this week.

The video shows the bear struggling to walk as it searches for food. The bear eventually comes across a trashcan used by Inuit fishermen, rummaging through it with little luck.

The bear, which was not old, probably died within hours of being captured on video, said Nicklen. “This is what starvation looks like. The muscles atrophy. No energy. It’s a slow, painful death.”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/dec/08/starving-polar-bear-arctic-climate-change-video?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Yahoo_Mail

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Lubaina Himid Wins the 2017 Turner Prize

Lubaina Himid Wins the 2017 Turner Prize

Posted in today in light of the 18th century by Editor on December 7, 2017


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Lubaina Himid, this year’s Turner Prize winner, engages various themes relevant to the eighteenth century—from porcelain to slavery to Hogarth—within the larger context of African diasporan contributions “to the richness and layering of European culture.” The work is on display at Ferens Art Gallery, Hull for a few more weeks.

Turner Prize 2017
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, 26 September 2017 — 7 January 2018

Turner Prize, one of the world’s most renowned art prizes, is awarded by Tate to an artist who has exhibited outstanding work in the previous year. The four shortlisted artists for 2017—Hurvin Anderson, Andrea Büttner, Lubaina Himid, and Rosalind Nashashibi—will exhibit their work at Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, from September with the overall winner announced in early December. Through genres such as portraiture, landscape and still life, the four artists explore how art is able to respond to political and social upheaval.

Read more: https://enfilade18thc.com/2017/12/07/turner-prize-2017-awarded-to-lubaina-himid/

The journal and drawings of Mary Emma Walter

http://blogs.bl.uk/.a/6a00d8341c464853ef01b8d2c2b961970c-pi

 

Mary Emma Walter’s journal and album of drawings in the India Office Private Papers are two of my favourite collection items.   The illustrated journal describes the voyage to India and her life as an army officer’s wife.  Letters sent to her mother in England have been copied in. The album contains pictures of views, flowers, people, and objects.

Mary Emma was born on 23 July 1816, the daughter of James Battin Coulthard and his wife Mary née Lee. The family lived in Alton, Hampshire, where James served as a magistrate for many years.  On 3 January 1838 Mary Emma married Edward Walter, an officer in the East India Company’s Bombay Light Cavalry, who was on furlough in England.  The journal starts with the couple’s journey back to India in October 1838, travelling via France and Egypt.

Read more: http://blogs.bl.uk/untoldlives/2017/11/the-journal-and-drawings-of-mary-emma-walter.html

Liu Yifei gets starring role in Mulan, as tide turns against ‘whitewashing’

1986

Disney wins praise for casting actor also known as Crystal Liu to play warrior woman in live-action remake.

A Chinese actor will play the title role in a live-action remake of Disney’s Mulan, a move seen as a victory for Asian actors in Hollywood after repeated controversies over “whitewashing”.

Liu Yifei, who also uses the name Crystal Liu, was picked to star in the film after a worldwide search that screened nearly 1,000 candidates. The 30-year-old actor has appeared in more than a dozen films in China and began her career in television.

The decision to cast a Chinese actress was widely praised on social media after a series of controversies over whitewashing and follows Beyoncé’s casting in the upcoming Lion King remake.

Hollywood has attracted widespread criticism for casting white actors to play Asian characters. Tilda Swinton, Scarlett Johansson and Emma Stone have all played characters who were Asian in the source material.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/nov/30/mulan-tide-turns-against-whitewash-as-liu-yifei-gets-starring-role?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Yahoo_Mail

The Rani of Jhansi

Rani of Jhansi

Lakshmi Bai is probably the most famous woman in modern Indian history. The widowed Rani of Jhansi was pensioned off in 1854 when the East India Company annexed her state. She then fought against the British disguised as a man and died at their hands four years later during the Indian ‘Mutiny’.

An account of her death was given in a letter by John Latimer, a member of the Central India Field Force. Writing in camp in Kalpi on 24 June 1858 to his uncle in the UK , he describes the fighting and marches that he and his unit have recently endured. He goes on to say:

‘… a fine looking native woman was killed in the pursuit by a grape shot it is supposed, She was riding a white mare which was also shot, A beautifully limbed and pretty woman she must have been, the Jhansi Ranee is said to be very ugly otherwise we were all inclined to think and even hope it might be her, As it is the matter is likely to remain a mystery (unless some of the big fellows can manage to get some clue as to her identity) ‘.

Read more: http://blogs.bl.uk/untoldlives/2017/12/the-rani-of-jhansi.html

Why climate change is creating a new generation of child brides

As global warming exacerbates drought and floods, farmers’ incomes plunge – and girls as young as 13 are given away to stave off poverty.

It was the flood that ensured that Ntonya Sande’s first year as a teenager would also be the first year of her married life. Up to the moment the water swept away her parents’ field in Kachaso in the Nsanje district of Malawi, they had been scraping a living. Afterwards they were reduced to scavenging for bits of firewood to sell.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/nov/26/climate-change-creating-generation-of-child-brides-in-africa?